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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 89-91

Norwegian scabies in a renal transplant patient


1 Department of Nephrology, Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Centre, Madurai- 625 107, India
2 Department of Dermatology, Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Centre, Madurai- 625 107, India

Correspondence Address:
K Sampathkumar
Department of Nephrology, Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Centre, Lake Area, Melur Road, Madurai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.65302

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A variety of skin infections are encountered in postrenal transplant setting. Though bacterial and fungal infections are more common, surprises are in store for us sometimes. We describe a patient who underwent renal transplant two years ago, presenting with a painless, mildly pruritic expanding skin rash over abdomen. Histological examination of the skin biopsy showed that stratum corneum had multiple burrows containing larvae and eggs of Sarcoptes scabiei. The patient was treated with ivermectin 12 mg weekly once for 2 doses along with topical 5% permethrin and permethrin soap bath. There was remarkable improvement in the skin lesions with complete resolution in two weeks. Norwegian or crusted scabies is caused by massive infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis. It can be rarely encountered in the post-transplant setting, which underscores the importance of early diagnosis and treatment before secondary bacterial infection sets in.






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Indian Journal of Nephrology
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Online since 20th Sept '07