Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Author Reply
Book Review
Brief Communication
Case Report
Case Series
Clinical Case Report
Clinicopathological Conference
Commentary
Corrigendum
Editorial
Editorial – World Kidney Day 2016
Editorial Commentary
Erratum
Foreward
Guidelines
Image in Nephrology
Images in Nephrology
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Literature Review
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Perspective
Research Letter
Retraction Notice
Review
Review Article
Short Review
Special Article
Special Feature
Special Feature - World Kidney Day
Systematic Review
Technical Note
Varia
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Author Reply
Book Review
Brief Communication
Case Report
Case Series
Clinical Case Report
Clinicopathological Conference
Commentary
Corrigendum
Editorial
Editorial – World Kidney Day 2016
Editorial Commentary
Erratum
Foreward
Guidelines
Image in Nephrology
Images in Nephrology
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Literature Review
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Perspective
Research Letter
Retraction Notice
Review
Review Article
Short Review
Special Article
Special Feature
Special Feature - World Kidney Day
Systematic Review
Technical Note
Varia
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Letter to Editor
33 (
6
); 482-483
doi:
10.4103/ijn.ijn_82_23

Metastatic Thyroid Abscess: A Rare Presentation of Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection in an End-Stage Kidney Disease Patient on Hemodialysis

Department of Nephrology, Nizams Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
Address for correspondence: Dr. Siddharth Herur, Department of Nephrology, Nizam’s Institute of Medical Sciences, Punjagutta, Hyderabad - 500 082, Telangana, India. E-mail: siddhu.bmcri@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Dear Editor,

Over two-third of patients initiated on hemodialysis (HD) in India have temporary catheters as the initial venous access.[1] Bloodstream infections caused by infection of the catheters can lead to metastatic complications like infective endocarditis and septic arthritis.[2] We report a case of acute suppurative thyroiditis in an end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patient with a history of prolonged use of non-tunneled catheter.

A 35-year-old male had been undergoing HD through a right internal jugular non-tunneled catheter for three months. He presented to us with complaints of high fever, chills and rigors, swelling of the neck, and dysphagia for 10 days. Local examination revealed a large, tender, warm, and fluctuant anterior neck mass [Figure 1a].

Figure 1
(a) A patient having diffuse painful neck swelling on admission. (b) Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the neck showing multiple hypodense collections in both lobes of the thyroid and extending to the retropharyngeal space. (c) Resolution of swelling of the same patient after treatment

Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the neck revealed multiple loculated hypodense collections, approximating around 90 cc and showing enhancement of walls and septa in both lobes of the thyroid: these were suggestive of acute suppurative thyroiditis [Figure 1b]. Blood cultures sent from the catheter, peripheral blood, and pus culture from the thyroid abscess grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Henceforth, a diagnosis of metastatic thyroid abscess secondary to catheter-related bloodstream infection was considered.

The catheter was removed followed by ultrasound-guided drainage of the abscess and antibiotics as per culture sensitivity. There was complete resolution of the abscess [Figure 1c].

Metastatic infections have been observed in approximately 5%–10% of patients undergoing HD through central venous catheters.[3] The tough capsule, high iodine content, and good lymphatic drainage make the thyroid gland resistant to infections.[4] We could find only one other case[5] that reported acute suppurative thyroiditis in an ESKD patient. CRBSI presenting as thyroid abscess is extremely rare and should always be suspected in any HD patient with painful neck swelling.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

  1. , , , , , . Haemodialysis vascular access:current practices amongst Indian nephrologists. J Vasc Access. 2018;19:172-6.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. , , , , , . Hemodialysis catheters:Update on types, outcomes, designs and complications. Semin Intervent Radiol. 2022;39:90-102.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. , , . Management of the hemodialysis patient with catheter-related bloodstream infection. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2019;14:611-3.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. , , , . Acute suppurative thyroiditis with thyroid abscess in adults:Clinical presentation, treatment and outcomes. BMC Endocr Disord. 2019;19:130.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. , , , , . Painful neck swelling in a patient with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis. BMJ Case Rep. 2019;12:e229085. doi:10.1136/bcr-2018-229085
    [Google Scholar]
Show Sections